Skin Cancer

Skin Protection and Why We Need SPF

UV Radiation is the primary cause of free radicals in the skin. You have two types that you should be concerned about UVA/UVB.

The UVB rays stand for BURN, you will feel these rays. Unfortunately, one of the most damaging rays UVA you don’t feel. UVA can penetrate through clouds or glass. Riding in your car or sitting by a sunny window will give you damage that you won’t feel. Thus is why most people have more sun damage on the left side of their face, it is exposed next to the window while driving. UVA rays are present year round. You will not see the damage from these rays for several years. They also penetrate the skin 30-40 times deeper than UVB rays.

How do we protect our skin from this type of damage? Choose IS Clinical SPF 50, it is a broad spectrum SPF that protects against UVA/UVB rays. This formula is oil free and vitamin E enriched making it a perfect solution for all skin types especially oily/acne skin.

Be sure to apply your SPF 30 minutes before you go out and saturate your outer part of your skin the epidermis.

Learn more about skin protection and SPF by visiting Jo Ann at Skindeepgj.com or by calling 970-250-9249

 

Skin Cancer Diagnosis

http://skincancer.about.com/od/diagnosis/a/diagnosis.htm?r=facebook

Please be sure to check your skin for any changes and understand the diagnosis. See your Doctor if you question any skin lesion.

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Basal Cell Carcinomas

Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma may present as a lump, usually shiny, light or dark, or capillaries and veins inside. Other times it may look like a sore or wound that does not heal and grows larger, or a scar or grows very slowly peels. Know what the signs look like and see a Dermatologist or Plastic Surgeon

Tanning beds linked to skin cancer

Women who use tanning salons have a somewhat increased risk of skin cancer, according to a study that adds to evidence that baking in a tan bed can be as bad as baking under the sun.

The study, by a team at Harvard Medical School, looked at data from nearly 730,000 nurses followed for 20 years and found that women who used tanning beds in their youth were more likely than others to develop skin cancer. Though many studies have linked tanning beds to a higher skin cancer risk, the link to basal cell carcinoma, by far the most common form of skin cancer, have been inconsistent.

“We … investigated whether frequency of tanning bed use during high school/college and at ages 25 to 36 years were associated with a risk of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma,” wrote Jiali Han and colleagues in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“Our data provide evidence for a dose-response relationship between tanning bed use and the risk of skin cancers, especially basal cell carcinoma, and the association is stronger for patients with a younger age at exposure.”

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Children Need Sunscreen

It is Crucial for Children to Wear Sunscreen

Despite numerous efforts to encourage people to wear sunscreen, a new study shows only 1 in 4 children regularly uses sunscreen.

Researchers say more than half of the children studied also reported having a sunburn in the previous summer. Experts say those results are troubling. The problem is if you sunburn in childhood, you raise your risk of developing skin cancer later on.Recent studies showed that children who have a sunburn at an early age are nearly twice as likely to develop melanoma in adulthood. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, and is responsible for nearly 9,000 deaths in the U.S. each year.

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Did You Know

SKIN CANCER ALERT

People in their teens and 20’s, don’t appreciate the damage ultraviolet radiation can do.  Melanoma is the second leading cause of cancer of any time in patients age 15 through 29.

Melanoma is one of three types of skin cancer but is responsible for 75 percent of all deaths from the disease.

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Indoor tanning linked to skin cancer

Indoor tanning linked to skin cancer

Photo by Yale Office of Public Affairs.

By Michelle Hackman

Staff Reporter

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Indoor tanning may significantly increase the risk of developing early-onset skin cancer, a new Yale study has found.

A team of researchers from the Yale School of Public Health reported that individuals who used tanning beds at least once are at a 69 percent greater risk of developing basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer, before the age of 40. The study, published in the December issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, found skin cancer risk was correlated with frequency of tanning, and the effect was especially pronounced for women. Experts interviewed say that the study’s findings are unsurprising, given past research on the dangers of indoor tanning, but will still help raise public awareness of the issue.

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